Campaign News

Archive

Canada joins the CleanSeas campaign!

UN Environment is delighted to welcome Canada as the 26th country to join the CleanSeas campaign against marine litter.

With over 200,000km of coastline, Canada has the longest shores in the world, and has been at the forefront of international efforts to protect the marine environment. Having the Canadians onboard is a real milestone for CleanSeas and great news for the world’s oceans.

“The Government of Canada regards [CleanSeas] as an important initiative that solidifies its commitment to take action in order to keep waters clean and safe for generations to come,” said Canada’s Environment Minister, Catherine McKenna, announcing new commitments to prevent pollution, research the impact of microplastics, and fund community-based programs, including shorefront clean-ups.

UN Environment and CleanSeas are very proud to have the support of such a powerful advocate for the health of our oceans.

“After the excellent cooperation for World Environment Day 2017, we are thrilled by this announcement,” said Erik Solheim, head of UN Environment. “Canada’s continued commitment confirms that we are heading in the right direction with the fight against marine pollution. We look forward to working together to turn the tide on plastic pollution in our oceans.”

Each year, at least 8 million tonnes of plastic end up in the oceans. If no action is taken, by 2050 there could be more plastic than fish in the sea. CleanSeas works with governments, the private sector and civil society to radically change our relationship with plastics by improving industrial processes, phasing out non-recoverable plastics, and drastically cutting back on single-use plastic within the next five years.

UN Environment launches second online course on marine litter

Want to learn more about one of our most pressing environmental issues? Then sign up for UN Environment’s second massive open online course. The enrollment deadline has been extended to 8 June.

Read the full article here

 

Effort to clean up ocean plastic to begin in 12 months, years ahead of schedule

A Dutch foundation dedicated to removing plastic pollution from the world’s oceans announced a new system design today that will allow them to begin an ambitious cleanup plan in the next 12 months, two years ahead of schedule.
 

Read the full article here

 

Keep plastics out of oceans

The UN Environment Programme, UNEP, has cautioned that there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans by 2050 unless people stop using single-use plastic items such as plastic bags and plastic bottles, commented a UAE daily.
 

Read the full article here

 

UN Urges Action as Microplastics in the Ocean Outnumber the Stars

If you’ve ever laid on a blanket and looked up at the night sky, you know how mind-blowing it is to consider the sheer number of stars in our galaxy – between 100 and 400 billion, according to scientists. Now, think about how heartbreaking it is to find out that there are more microscopic pieces of plastic in our oceans than there are stars in the Milky Way.
 

Read the full article here

 

FEATURE-Kenya seeks to cure plastic bag addiction with blanket ban

NAKURU, Kenya, May 2 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The sight of overflowing heaps of plastic waste at Gioto, the largest dump in Nakuru County, in Kenya's Great Rift Valley, was an eyesore that turned photojournalist James Wakibia into an environmental activist.
 

Read the full article here

 

The Nordic Council of Ministers supports the UN’s #CleanSeas campaign

Working toward cleaner seas in the Nordic Region and the world

The Nordic Council of Ministers supports the UN’s #CleanSeas campaign. The Nordic activities will be publicised on social media using the hashtags #CleanSeas and #Norden2017! The material on this site is also free to use.
 

Read the full article here

Women in Uganda Are Turning Plastic Straw Waste Into Art – Creating Jobs and Cleaning the Planet (VIDEO)

Plastic is, without a doubt, making our life a lot easier. But that, of course, is not the end of the story. Currently, it is also one of the biggest threats to our planet. Globally, we produce 300 million tons of plastic per year and leave 78 percent of it unrecycled. Every year, around 8.8 million tons of plastic end up in the oceans, endangering countless marine animals. It’s estimated that 700 species of marine animals are now faced with extinction because of the threat of ingestion of and entanglement in plastic trash. Whether we like it or not, it is time to reconsider our relationship with disposable plastics – every single plastic bag, bottle, and straw.

Read the full article here

Kenya seeks to cure plastic bag addiction with blanket ban

NAKURU, Kenya - The sight of overflowing heaps of plastic waste at Gioto, the largest dump in Nakuru County, in Kenya’s Great Rift Valley, was an eyesore that turned photojournalist James Waikibia into an environmental activist.

Read the full article here

 

These Awesome Breakthroughs in the Fight Against Plastic Pollution Will Give You Hope!

There is no doubt that we have reached crisis point with our plastic obsession. This material is seemingly ubiquitous in everyday society, used to wrap just about any product you can think of on grocery store shelves. Given the durability and convenience of plastic, it is easy to see why it has become so popular. However, the shocking truth is that unless we humans manage to ditch our attachment to plastic, it may end up destroying life on our planet as we know it.

Read the full article here

Tunisia bans disposable plastic shopping bags

In an effort to reduce plastic waste, shoppers will no longer be able to get single-use bags at supermarkets.

If you happen to be shopping for groceries in Tunisia, you won’t be able to get a free, thin plastic bag in which to take home your purchases. As of 1 March 2017, single-use plastic bags have been banned in supermarkets, making it the first Arab nation to take such a step.

Read the full article here

New Zealand will ban plastic microbeads by 2018

If cosmetics companies won't self-regulate, then it's up to countries to take a strong stance against these nasty miniature pollutants.

New Zealand is the latest country to take action against insidious plastic microbeads. Earlier this year, environment minister Nick Smith announced that microbeads would no longer be allowed in any cosmetics or personal care items, starting July 1, 2018, and that any company caught sneaking them into products would be fined NZ $100,000 (US $73,000).

Read the full article here

Kenya announces breakthrough ban on plastic bags

15 March 2017 – The Government of Kenya announced today a ban on the use, manufacture and import of all plastic bags, to take effect in six months. This announcement comes just three weeks after the UN declared a “war on plastic” through its new Clean Seas initiative, which has already secured commitments to address major plastic pollution from 10 governments.

Some 100 million plastic bags are handed out every year in Kenya by supermarkets alone. Long identified as a major cause of environmental damage and health problems, they kill birds, fish and other animals that mistake them for food, damage agricultural land, pollute tourist sites and provide breeding grounds for the mosquitoes that carry malaria and dengue fever.

Read the full article here

 

Campaign Art: By 2050 more plastic in the oceans than fish?

Did you know that 60-90% of marine litter is plastic?

Did you know that each year about 8 million tons of plastic ends up in the oceans?

Did you know that each year, over 4 billion coffee cups end up in landfills?

Did you know that up to 51 trillion micro plastic particles are already in our oceans?

Did you know that by 2050, an estimated 99% of seabirds will have ingested plastic?

Why do these numbers matter? With increased human activity both on land and seas, and unsustainable production and consumption habits, our oceans and other world’s bodies of water are getting more and more polluted.

Read the full article here

Beach clean-ups in Mumbai inspired global Clean Seas campaign: UNEP head

The Clean Seas global campaign that was launched in Indonesia during the last week of February was inspired by beach clean-up efforts in Mumbai over the past 18 months, said top officials from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on Tuesday.

UNEP head Erik Solheim, on his second visit to Mumbai, told Hindustan Times about the plans for the global beach clean-up drive and the way ahead for Indian cities to tackle other environment related issues.

“Inspired by Afroz Shah and other Mumbai residents, who have kept Versova Beach plastic free for over a year now, we launched our international campaign, a global war against marine litter, in Bali, Indonesia on February 25,” said Solheim. “Similar to the Versova Residents Volunteers (VRV), a parallel group in Bali has been initiated and chalked out a plan to clear their beaches of plastic.”

Read the full article here

Africa: UN Declares War On Ocean Plastic

Rome — The available data is enough for the United Nations to literally declare war on oceans plastic: more than 8 million tonnes of leaks into their waters each year – equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic every minute, wreaking havoc on marine wildlife, fisheries and tourism, and costing at least 8 billion dollars in damage to marine ecosystems.

In fact, the Nairobi-based United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on February 23 launched an unprecedented global campaign to eliminate major sources of marine litter: micro-plastics in cosmetics and the excessive, wasteful usage of single-use plastic by the year 2022.

Read the full article here

Video captures moment plastic enters food chain

A scientist has filmed the moment plastic microfibre is ingested by plankton, illustrating how the material is affecting life beneath the waves.

The footage shows one way that waste plastic could be entering the marine and global food chain.

An estimated 150 million tonnes of plastic "disappears" from the world's waste stream each year.

Waste plastic in the world's seas has been recognised by the United Nations as a major environmental problem.

Read the full article here

Indonesia pledges $1bn a year to curb ocean waste

Only China dumps more plastic in the ocean than Indonesia. But by 2025, the world’s largest archipelago aims to reduce marine waste by 70%

Indonesia has pledged up to $1bn a year to dramatically reduce the amount of plastic and other waste products polluting its waters. The announcement was made by Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, Indonesia’s coordinating minister for maritime affairs at last week’s 2017 World Oceans Summit in Nusa Dua, Bali.

Pandjaitan told delegates at the conference that Indonesia would achieve a 70% reduction in marine waste within eight years. He proposed developing new industries that use biodegradable materials such as cassava and seaweed to produce plastic alternatives. Other measures could include a nationwide tax on plastic bags as well as a sustained public education campaign.

Read the full article here

 

Digital News Agency: Actor Adrian Grenier and the Ocean Community Make a Pledge of Protection on Day One of The Economist's World Ocean Summit

BALI, Indonesia, Thursday 23rd February, 2017 -The 2017 World Ocean Summit started with a call to action. There have been many conversations about creating a sustainable ‘ blue economy’, but the time has come to start doing something about it. 

There are huge economic and growth opportunities from investing into the ocean, but also a massive environmental responsibility that needs to be considered. 

Panels and interviews included in-depth discussions about plastics and other marine litter, financing the transition to more environmentally-friendly ocean industries, and the complications of moving to more sustainable fishing practices.

Read the full article here

الأمم المتحدة اطلقت حملة بحار نظيفة للقضاء على المصادر الرئيسية للنفايات البحرية

طلقت الأمم المتحدة للبيئة اليوم حملة "بحار نظيفة" للقضاء على المصادر الرئيسية للنفايات البحرية: الحبيبات الدقيقة المستخدمة في مستحضرات التجميل، والاستخدام المفرط والمسرف للبلاستيك الذي يستخدم لمرة واحدة بحلول العام 2022، بمشاركة عشرة بلدان وشركة DELL العاملة في مجال الكمبيوتر، وعارضة الأزياء ناديا هوتاغالونغ، والممثل أدريان غرينير والمغني جاك جونسون.

وتحض حملة "بحار نظيفة" التي تم إطلاقها خلال قمة الاقتصاديين العالمية المعنية بالمحيط في مدينة بالي، الحكومات على الالتزام بسياسات الحد من استخدام البلاستيك، والتي تستهدف الشركات الصناعية لتقليل إنتاج البلاستيك. وتدعو المستهلكين لوضع حد لهذه العادة المتمثلة في استخدام البلاستيك قبل أن ينتهي بها المطاف في البحار.

اقرأ المقال كاملا هنا

راغب علامة يطلق حملة جديدة والجمهور ينضم إليه تفاعل كبير حظيت به الحملة وقد ظهر ذلك بوضوح من خلال التعليقات التي إنهالت على راغب علامة من كل حدب وصوب من الجمهور ومحبّيه

متابعة بتجـــــــــــــــــردأعلن السوبر ستار راغب علامة بالتعاون مع المنظمة العالمية للأمم  المتحدة لشؤون البيئة عن اطلاق حملة بعنوان “بحار نظيفة” كشف من خلالها عن “تدابير طموحة” للقضاء على استخدام أكياس البلاستيك التي تستخدم لمرة واحدة.

اقرأ المقال كاملا هنا

Ecowatch: Microplastics in Oceans Outnumber Stars in Our Galaxy by 500 Times

The United Nations is "declaring war" on the biggest sources of planetary pollution—ocean plastic. On Thursday, the intergovernmental organization's environment program (UNEP) launched its #CleanSeas campaign at the World Ocean Summit hosted by The Economist in Bali, Indonesia.

The unprecedented global initiative urges governments and businesses to take measures to eliminate microplastics from cosmetics and personal care items, ban or tax single-use plastic bags and dramatically reduce other disposable plastic items by 2022. Everyday citizens are also encouraged to join the fight.

Read the full article here

Sky News: UN takes aim at 'wasteful' plastics in world's oceans

The UN wants to eliminate two major sources of marine litter from the oceans by 2022.

Under fire are microplastics in cosmetics and single-use plastics, such as water bottles and plastic bags, with the UN calling their use "wasteful" and "excessive".

The announcement comes as Sky's Ocean Rescue campaign highlights the widespread problems caused by plastic in the world's oceans.

Read the full article here

The Hindu: UNEP starts campaign to end marine litter

The UN Environment Programme on Thursday launched an unprecedented global campaign to eliminate major sources of marine litter — microplastics in cosmetics and the excessive, wasteful usage of single-use plastic — by 2022.

Launched at the Economist World Ocean Summit in this Indonesian island known for coral reefs, the #CleanSeas campaign is urging governments to pass plastic reduction policies; targeting industry to minimise plastic packaging and redesign products; and calling on consumers to change their throwaway habits — before irreversible damage is done to our seas.

Read the full article here

UN News Centre: ‘Turn the tide on plastic’ urges UN, as microplastics in the seas now outnumber stars in our galaxy

23 February 2017 – Launching an unprecedented global campaign, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is urging everyone to eliminate the use of microplastics and stop the excessive, wasteful use of single-use plastic, to save the world’s seas and oceans from irreversible damage before it’s too late.

“Plastic pollution is surfing onto Indonesian beaches, settling onto the ocean floor at the North Pole, and rising through the food chain onto our dinner tables,” Erik Solheim, the Executive Director of UNEP, said in a news release announcing the campaign.

“We’ve stood by too long as the problem has gotten worse. It must stop,” he added.

Read the full article here

Sustainability Foundation mobilizes the efforts to implement beach clean up campaign to remove plastic

On the occasion of the National Environment Day which held on February 20, 2017 and with approaching the date of the World Summit conference on oceans, and in response to the call of the United Nations Environment Programme which will launch a global campaign on February 23, 2017 aimed at turning the tide on plastic, the Sustainability Foundation encourages and call on authorities to try to reduce the use of plastic in its various forms.

Read the full article here

Al Jazeera: Plan to reduce marine plastic waste launched in Indonesia

The United Nations has a new plan to stop oceans filling up with rubbish.

They want to stop people using some plastic bags and microbeads in cosmetic products within the next five years.

Ten countries have signed up to the Clean Seas Initiative, including Indonesia, which is the world's second largest producer of plastic waste.

Watch the Video

Mares limpios

Cada año, más de 8 millones de toneladas de plástico terminan en los océanos. Esto causa estragos en la flora y fauna marina, la pesca y el turismo. El 90% de la basura que flota en nuestros océanos es plástico.

Uruguay incrementó su trabajo, en estos últimos años, en la gestión ambientalmente adecuada de los diferentes tipos de residuos, en particular los microplásticos y la afectación que producen a nuestros mares y océanos. El proyecto de Ley de residuos en elaboración; la Ley de bolsas plásticas a estudio del Parlamento; y el trabajo que lidera el Mvotma desde el año 2009 en “Limpieza de costas”, son acciones y compromisos concretos en los que nuestro país está embarcado.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

La ONU declara la guerra al plástico en los océanos

Bali, Indonesia, 23 de febrero de 2017 – ONU Medio Ambiente lanzó hoy una campaña mundial sin precedentes para eliminar de ahora a 2022 las principales fuentes de basura marina: las microperlas utilizadas en productos cosméticos y el uso excesivo de plásticos de un solo uso.

Presentada en Bali durante la Cumbre Mundial del Océano, organizada por The Economist, la campaña #MaresLimpios exhorta a los gobiernos a comprometerse con políticas para la reducción del plástico, pide a la industria minimizar los envases elaborados con este material y rediseñar sus productos, y apela a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos, antes de que perjudiquen irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Panama´s director of Oceans from the Ministry of Environment, Ricardo de Ycaza, endorsed the campaign in an interview with a local newspaper.

IPS: La ONU le declara la guerra al plástico de los océanos

ROMA, 23 feb 2017 (IPS) - La ONU declara la guerra a los plásticos que inundan los océanos: más de ocho millones de toneladas terminan en sus aguas cada año, como si se vertiera un camión de ese material por minuto, lo que causa estragos en la vida marina, la pesca y el turismo, y tiene un costo de unos 8.000 millones de dólares.

De hecho, el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma), con sede en Nairobi, lanzó este jueves 23 una campaña mundial para eliminar para 2022 las principales fuentes de la contaminación marina, como son los microplásticos contenidos en productos cosméticos y el despilfarro de artículos descartados con un solo uso.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

NTN24: Mares limpios - ONU lanza campaña para acabar con las principales fuentes de residuos en los océanos

El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó este miércoles una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema "#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!", la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos "antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos".

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El Espectador: Uruguay lidera lucha contra la basura marina en A. Latina

El Caribe y el Pacífico centroamericano son los mares que acumulan la mayor cantidad de basura de todo el continente, en su gran mayoría plásticos y microperlas usadas en productos cosméticos, alertó hoy en Panamá un experto de ONU Ambiente.

"Cada mar tiene sus propios desafíos, pero en el Pacífico sur, desde Colombia a Chile, no hay tanta basura marina como en el Pacífico centroamericano y en el Caribe", explicó a Efe el experto en Ecosistemas de ONU Ambiente, Alberto Pacheco.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El Mostrador: ONU lanza campaña mundial para acabar con residuos de plástico en los océanos

El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema "#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!", la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos "antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos".

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El País: ONU: Los mares de Centroamérica son los que más basura tienen del continente

Panamá, 22 feb (EFE).- El Caribe y el Pacífico centroamericano son los mares que acumulan la mayor cantidad de basura de todo el continente, en su gran mayoría plásticos y microperlas usadas en productos cosméticos, alertó hoy en Panamá un experto de ONU Ambiente.

“Cada mar tiene sus propios desafíos, pero en el Pacífico sur, desde Colombia a Chile, no hay tanta basura marina como en el Pacífico centroamericano y en el Caribe”, explicó a Efe el experto en Ecosistemas de ONU Ambiente, Alberto Pacheco.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

La Estrella: ONU declara lucha global contra el plástico y Panamá se une a la causa

La Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU) declaró oficialmente la guerra al plástico en los océanos y Panamá se une a la iniciativa mundial para eliminar, de ahora a 2022, las principales fuentes de basura marina: las microperlas utilizadas en productos cosméticos y el uso excesivo de plásticos de un solo uso.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El Nuevo Diario: ONU lanza campaña mundial para acabar con residuos de plástico en los océanos

EL NUEVO DIARIO, NAIROBI.- El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema "#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!", la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos "antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos".

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Telemetro TV: Los mares de Centroamérica son los que más basura tienen del continente

El Caribe y el Pacífico centroamericano son los mares que acumulan la mayor cantidad de basura de todo el continente, en su gran mayoría plásticos y microperlas usadas en productos cosméticos, alertó hoy en Panamá un experto de ONU Ambiente.

"Cada mar tiene sus propios desafíos, pero en el Pacífico sur, desde Colombia a Chile, no hay tanta basura marina como en el Pacífico centroamericano y en el Caribe", explicó a Efe el experto en Ecosistemas de ONU Ambiente, Alberto Pacheco.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

El Espectador: ONU lanza una campaña para limpiar el plástico de los océanos

Según el organismo, el plástico supone el 80% de la basura en los océanos y causa daños por valor de 8.000 millones de dólares en el ecosistema marino.

La ONU lanzó este jueves una campaña global dirigida a gobiernos, empresas y consumidores para reducir los residuos de plástico en los océanos, donde cada año se tiran unas ocho toneladas de este material.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Opinión Pública TV: La ONU ‘declara la guerra’ al plástico en los océanos

Bali, Indonesia.- ONU Medio Ambiente lanzó este día una campaña mundial sin precedentes para eliminar de ahora a 2022 las principales fuentes de basura marina: las microperlas utilizadas en productos cosméticos y el uso excesivo de plásticos de un solo uso.

Presentada en Bali durante la Cumbre Mundial del Océano, organizada por The Economist, la campaña #MaresLimpios exhorta a los gobiernos a comprometerse con políticas para la reducción del plástico, pide a la industria minimizar los envases elaborados con este material y rediseñar sus productos, y apela a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos, antes de que perjudiquen irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Informador: La ONU lanza campaña para acabar con residuos de plástico en océanos

NAIROBI, KENIA (22/FEB/2017).- El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema "#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!", la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos "antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos".

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Tempo.co: Govt to Reduce Plastic Wastes by 70 Percent

The Indonesian government is committed to reducing plastic wastes by 70 percent by the end of 2025, initiated with the launch of a national action plan for tackling plastic wastes in oceans.

Indonesia, along with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), has launched a campaign to remove plastic wastes in Nusa Dua, Bali, on Thursday.

"By the end of 2025, we will reduce 70 percent of the plastic wastes. Indonesia has launched a national action plan for tackling marine plastic wastes," Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs Luhut Binsar Panjaitan stated in a press release received by ANTARA, Thursday.

Read the full article here

The Economic Times: Tackling pollution, investing in renewables will help India's economy: UNEP chief Erik Solheim

NEW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

"With Indian firms l ..

NEW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

"With Indian firms l ..

EW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/57309166.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
EW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

NEW DELHI: India has some of the most polluted cities in the world. It also needs to create jobs. So it is not rocket science to figure out that tackling pollution and shifting investment towards renewables will help India's economy. For this, the Indian government needs to provide a conducive legislative framework and its financial markets and outside investors need to step in, says United Nations Environment Programme  (UNEP) Executive Director Erik Solheim.

"With Indian firms like Infosys and Tata getting on board, it's easy to see where the market is going," Solheim told IANS in an exclusive online interview from Bali, Indonesia, where he is attending a global environmental conference. 

Read the full article here

 

The Indian Xpress: 10 countries join UN environment’s war on marine litter

BALI: The UN Environment on Thursday launched an unprecedented global campaign to eliminate major sources of marine litter: microplastics in cosmetics and the excessive, wasteful usage of single-use plastic by 2022.

Ten countries – Belgium, Costa Rica, France, Grenada, Indonesia, Norway, Panama, Saint Lucia, Sierra Leone and Uruguay – have joined the the #CleanSeas campaign, launched at the Economist World Ocean Summit in this Indonesian island known for coral reefs.

Read the full article here

EFEverde: La ONU lanza una campaña mundial para acabar con los plásticos en los océanos

El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Bajo el lema “#MaresLimpios, ¡Cambia la marea del plástico!“, la ONU pidió a los Gobiernos que lleven a cabo políticas para la reducción del plásticos, y apeló a los consumidores a que abandonen el hábito de usar y tirar productos plásticos “antes de que perjudique irreversiblemente a nuestros océanos”.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

ANSA: L'Onu dichiara 'guerra' a plastica oceani con #CleanSeas

Oltre 8 milioni di tonnellate di plastica finiscono ogni anno nei mari del globo: come se ogni minuto si riversasse in acqua un camion pieno di rifiuti. Con queste stime alla mano l'Onu dichiara "guerra" alla plastica negli oceani con una nuova campagna di pulizia e sensibilizzazione globale. Obiettivo: eliminare entro il 2022 le principali fonti di inquinamento marino, dalle microplastiche in ambito cosmetico all'eccessivo uso di oggetti di plastica usa e getta (come buste o bottiglie).

Leggi l'articolo completo qui

Lavenir: #CleanSeas - comment nous pouvons contribuer au nettoyage des océans

Utiliser une gourde plutôt que des bouteilles en plastique ou éviter les sacs à usage unique: les gestes pour éviter de voir nos océans transformés en poubelles de plastique sont nombreux. Petit tour d’horizon à l’occasion de la campagne #CleanSeas lancée par les Nations Unies, à laquelle adhère la Belgique.

Lire l'article complet ici

 

365 News: Indonesia Pledges $1 B Annually to Clean Up Its Seas

Nusa Dua, Bali. Indonesia has pledged up to $1 billion annually to clean up its seas from plastic debris and other waste over the next eight years.

“At the end of 2025 we will have gotten rid of 70 percent of the plastic waste in our seas,” Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan said on Wednesday (23/02).

The average Indonesian uses between 0.8 to 1 kilogram of plastic bags every year, most of which end up on rivers and streams and are washed away to the sea.

The country is the second largest plastic polluter in the world’s oceans — after China — according to a study published in the Science journal in 2015.

Read the full article here

The Huffington Post: There’s A Bold New Plan To Make Ocean Trash A Thing Of The Past

The way things are going now, our oceans will contain more plastic than fish by 2050. An ambitious United Nations campaign aims to stop this from happening.

On Wednesday, UN Environment announced its #CleanSeas initiative at the Economist World Ocean Summit in Bali, Indonesia. The campaign focuses on two major sources of marine litter: single-use plastic bags and microplastics in cosmetic products. The goal is to eliminate these major sources of marine litter by 2022.

Read the full article here

EFE: La ONU lanza una campaña mundial para acabar con los residuos de plástico en los océanos

El Programa de Naciones para el Medio Ambiente (Pnuma) lanzó hoy una campaña mundial para eliminar en 2022 las principales fuentes de basura en los océanos, entre las que predomina el plástico.

Lea el artículo completo aquí

Indo Asian News Service: UN Environment starts campaign to end marine litter

Bali, Feb 23 (IANS) The UN Environment Programme on Thursday launched an unprecedented global campaign to eliminate major sources of marine litter - microplastics in cosmetics and the excessive, wasteful usage of single-use plastic - by 2022.

Launched at the Economist World Ocean Summit in this Indonesian island known for coral reefs, the #CleanSeas campaign is urging governments to pass plastic reduction policies; targeting industry to minimise plastic packaging and redesign products; and calling on consumers to change their throwaway habits -- before irreversible damage is done to our seas.

Read the full article here

The Jakarta Post: Ocean Summit in Bali to discuss future of ‘blue’ economy

With seas around the globe facing unprecedented pressures caused by humans’ reckless endeavors, ranging from exploitative fishing to pollution, prominent international institutions and industry leaders as well as scientists and government representatives are set to convene to discuss the future of a sustainable ocean economy.

Read the full article here

The Independent: India just banned all forms of disposable plastic in its capital

India’s capital city Delhi has introduced a ban on disposable plastic.
 
Cutlery, bags, cups and other forms of single-use plastic were prohibited by the National Green Tribunal (NGT).
 
There is particular concern in the country about the amount of plastic waste it produces. According to the Times of India, it is responsible for an astonishing 60 per cent of the plastic that is dumped in the world’s oceans every year.
 
The ban affects the whole National Capital Territory (NCT) area of Delhi.
 
It was introduced after complaints about the illegal mass burning of plastic and other waste at three local rubbish dumps, which has been blamed for causing air pollution. The sites are supposed to operate as waste-to-energy plants.
 

The Independent: Johnson & Johnson will stop selling plastic cotton buds in half the world to help cut marine pollution

Multinational corporation Johnson & Johnson is to stop selling plastic cotton buds – one of the most common item of litter found on Britain’s beaches – in half the countries of the world after a campaign to cut marine pollution.
 
The company will instead use paper to make the stick of the buds.
 
Dr Clare Cavers of Scottish environmental charity Fidra, which ran a campaign to persuade people to stop using plastic cotton buds, said: “We commend Johnson & Johnson for leading this change in product material, it is an important part of the solution to the growing problem of plastic pollution in our seas.
 
“A step change in consumer behaviour is needed to ensure people dispose of waste responsibly and only flush toilet paper. 
 
“The message cannot be strong enough that only the three Ps (pee, toilet paper and poo) should be flushed, and anything else should go in a bin.”